Homepage

Careers in Healthcare

There has never been a better time to pursue a career in healthcare. Because of America’s aging population, the demand for healthcare professionals will only increase over the coming decade and beyond.

A career in healthcare can take many forms. Here are just a few of the possible career opportunities available. This is by no means a complete list:

  • Certified nurse assistant (or nurse’s aide)
  • Healthcare administrator
  • Home health aide
  • Licensed practical nurse
  • Medical assistant
  • Medical records and health information technicians
  • Patient care technician
  • Pharmacist
  • Phlebotomy technician
  • Physical therapist
  • Radiologist
  • State tested nurse’s aide
  • Registered nurse.

 

Certified nurse assistant

A certified nurse assistant or CNA (or in some states “State Tested Nurse Aide” or STNA), works alongside registered nurses to provide for patients’ basic health-care needs. These can include bathing, personal hygiene, feeding, and checking vital signs. CNAs usually work in hospitals, nursing homes, and elderly care homes.

The median salary is $24,420 though this is usually paid on an hourly basis averaging $10.78. For a career as a CNA, you need a high school diploma or GED, plus a 6-12 week certificate program. Demand for CNAs is high, so the job prospects are good.

Healthcare Administrator

Health care administrators work mainly in a hospital setting but may also work in such places as medical practices or home care agencies. They are responsible for managing and administering the facilities or departments, and ensuring compliance with government and state regulations.

Requirements include a 4-year bachelor’s degree plus, for higher-level positions, a graduate degree such as an MBA. The median salary in 2013 was $101,340. A health care administrator needs to be flexible, well-organized and a good communicator.

Home health aide

Home health aides work with the chronically sick, disabled or elderly. They most commonly work within a private home but may also work in an assisted living facility. Duties include helping with personal needs such as bathing and dressing, taking meals, light housework, and transporting to appointments.

There is no basic education or certification requirement, but those working in certified facilities are usually required to pass an exam after a 75-hour program. The median annual salary is $21,020, paid on an hourly basis of about $10.10.

Licensed practical nurse

Licensed practical nurses or LPNs work as members of a health-care team under the supervision of doctors and registered nurses. They perform a variety of duties, depending on requirements. Their work can include patient care, monitoring vital signs, and keeping charts up to date.

For a career as an LPN, you need to complete a 1-year certification program licensed in your state, and then pass your NCLEX-PN (National Council Licensure Examination — Practical Nurse) Exam. This enables you to apply for your license. The median salary is $41,540.

Medical Assistant

A medical assistant works alongside physicians to perform both clinical and administrative duties. Some are cross-trained to carry out both types of work while others specialize in one or the other.

Certification is not required but is preferred by most employers. Certifications include CMA (Certified Medical Assistant) or RMA (Registered Medical Assistant) and programs are available in most vocational schools and community colleges. The median annual wage was $29,370 in 2013.

Medical records and health information technicians

Medical records and health information technicians are responsible for arranging and organizing patients’ health information, and ensuring its accuracy. They also code and decode information for insurance purposes. They do not work directly with patients but work alongside registered nurses and other professionals, mainly in hospitals and doctors’ offices.

The median annual salary as of 2013 was $34,160. Certification, such as RHIT (Registered Health Information Technician) is not required but is usually preferred.

Patient care technician

A patient care technician, also known as a hospital assistant, works with health-care professionals to provide care for patients. This may include assistance with feeding, mobility requirements, and personal hygiene. It may also include taking and recording vital signs.

For a career as a patient care technician, you need a CNA (certified nursing assistant) certification, and to pass the NCPCT (National Certified Patient Care Technician) exam. You also need excellent interpersonal and communication skills. The median salary in 2013 was $24,890.

Pharmacist

Pharmacists are an integral part of the health-care team. They not only dispense medicine, but also check for interactions with other drugs, and instruct patients on the use of the drugs. Pharmacists usually run their own stores, but may also work in a hospital or other medical setting.

Pharmacy is an excellent career that requires a bachelor’s degree, followed by a 4-year PharmD (Doctor of Pharmacy) program, as a minimum. In order to practice, a state-specific license is also required. In 2013 the median salary was $119,280, ranging from $89,000 to $147,350.

Phlebotomy Technician

A phlebotomy technician specializes in drawing blood from the patient’s veins, treating the punctured area, and preparing the blood sample for testing. Technicians work primarily in hospitals or physicians’ offices, but may also work in diagnostic labs and similar facilities.

Some states, like California, require licensing and certification, while others do not, but either way, you require a high level of skill in interacting with patients. The average salary in 2012 was $35,000, working out at $12.50 an hour. The highest salaries are usually earned in laboratories, where they can rise to $75,000.

Physical therapist

A physical therapist is a highly-qualified health-care professional, who works closely with patients to improve their mobility and physical functioning. They work in a range of settings — not only hospitals, but clinics, schools, industrial settings, and fitness and sports facilities.

For a career in physical therapy, you require a graduate degree such as a DPT (Doctor of Physical Therapy). You then have to pass a state-administered national examination to receive your license. The median salary in 2013 was $86,030, ranging from $56,000 to $113,000.

Radiologist

Radiologists are very highly qualified medical doctors, specializing in using imaging technology to examine internal organs and tissues. They use not only x-rays, but ultrasound, CT and PET scans, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They also carry out surgical procedures using imaging guidelines.

Following medical school, a radiologist requires a 4-year radiology residency, and because the specialty requires top academic performance, an additional fellowship in a sub-specialism is also advisable. State licensure is also mandatory. Salaries are excellent, with the median salary in September 2014 reaching $329,323.

State tested nurse

State tested nurse aides (STNAs) are in great demand for work in hospitals, clinics, and care facilities. They work to improve the wellbeing of patients by helping with personal care, and monitoring their recovery progress. You can work as an STNA while training for more specialized jobs such as paramedics.

Most states offer a 108-hour STNA training program. This is available at community colleges and vocational schools, and you can take the state competency exam at the school. The average pay is $10.48 per hour.

Registered nurse

A registered nurse is the person with whom a hospital in-patient has the most contact. Registered nurses have the responsibility for monitoring a patient’s condition, carrying out prescribed medical procedures, and administering the correct medication. Many nurses specialize in a particular branch of medicine or advanced practice specialties such as nurse anesthetist or nurse practitioner.

For a career as a registered nurse, the industry standard qualification is the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree, plus the national licensing exam. The median salary in 2013 was $66,220, ranging from $45,630 to $96,320. The highest paid jobs are in California.

read more

Homepage

Careers in Healthcare

There has never been a better time to pursue a career in healthcare. Because of America’s aging population, the demand for healthcare professionals will only increase over the coming decade and beyond.

A career in healthcare can take many forms. Here are just a few of the possible career opportunities available. This is by no means a complete list:

  • Certified nurse assistant (or nurse’s aide)
  • Healthcare administrator
  • Home health aide
  • Licensed practical nurse
  • Medical assistant
  • Medical records and health information technicians
  • Patient care technician
  • Pharmacist
  • Phlebotomy technician
  • Physical therapist
  • Radiologist
  • State tested nurse’s aide
  • Registered nurse.

 

Certified nurse assistant

A certified nurse assistant or CNA (or in some states “State Tested Nurse Aide” or STNA), works alongside registered nurses to provide for patients’ basic health-care needs. These can include bathing, personal hygiene, feeding, and checking vital signs. CNAs usually work in hospitals, nursing homes, and elderly care homes.

The median salary is $24,420 though this is usually paid on an hourly basis averaging $10.78. For a career as a CNA, you need a high school diploma or GED, plus a 6-12 week certificate program. Demand for CNAs is high, so the job prospects are good.

Healthcare Administrator

Health care administrators work mainly in a hospital setting but may also work in such places as medical practices or home care agencies. They are responsible for managing and administering the facilities or departments, and ensuring compliance with government and state regulations.

Requirements include a 4-year bachelor’s degree plus, for higher-level positions, a graduate degree such as an MBA. The median salary in 2013 was $101,340. A health care administrator needs to be flexible, well-organized and a good communicator.

Home health aide

Home health aides work with the chronically sick, disabled or elderly. They most commonly work within a private home but may also work in an assisted living facility. Duties include helping with personal needs such as bathing and dressing, taking meals, light housework, and transporting to appointments.

There is no basic education or certification requirement, but those working in certified facilities are usually required to pass an exam after a 75-hour program. The median annual salary is $21,020, paid on an hourly basis of about $10.10.

Licensed practical nurse

Licensed practical nurses or LPNs work as members of a health-care team under the supervision of doctors and registered nurses. They perform a variety of duties, depending on requirements. Their work can include patient care, monitoring vital signs, and keeping charts up to date.

For a career as an LPN, you need to complete a 1-year certification program licensed in your state, and then pass your NCLEX-PN (National Council Licensure Examination — Practical Nurse) Exam. This enables you to apply for your license. The median salary is $41,540.

Medical Assistant

A medical assistant works alongside physicians to perform both clinical and administrative duties. Some are cross-trained to carry out both types of work while others specialize in one or the other.

Certification is not required but is preferred by most employers. Certifications include CMA (Certified Medical Assistant) or RMA (Registered Medical Assistant) and programs are available in most vocational schools and community colleges. The median annual wage was $29,370 in 2013.

Medical records and health information technicians

Medical records and health information technicians are responsible for arranging and organizing patients’ health information, and ensuring its accuracy. They also code and decode information for insurance purposes. They do not work directly with patients but work alongside registered nurses and other professionals, mainly in hospitals and doctors’ offices.

The median annual salary as of 2013 was $34,160. Certification, such as RHIT (Registered Health Information Technician) is not required but is usually preferred.

Patient care technician

A patient care technician, also known as a hospital assistant, works with health-care professionals to provide care for patients. This may include assistance with feeding, mobility requirements, and personal hygiene. It may also include taking and recording vital signs.

For a career as a patient care technician, you need a CNA (certified nursing assistant) certification, and to pass the NCPCT (National Certified Patient Care Technician) exam. You also need excellent interpersonal and communication skills. The median salary in 2013 was $24,890.

Pharmacist

Pharmacists are an integral part of the health-care team. They not only dispense medicine, but also check for interactions with other drugs, and instruct patients on the use of the drugs. Pharmacists usually run their own stores, but may also work in a hospital or other medical setting.

Pharmacy is an excellent career that requires a bachelor’s degree, followed by a 4-year PharmD (Doctor of Pharmacy) program, as a minimum. In order to practice, a state-specific license is also required. In 2013 the median salary was $119,280, ranging from $89,000 to $147,350.

Phlebotomy Technician

A phlebotomy technician specializes in drawing blood from the patient’s veins, treating the punctured area, and preparing the blood sample for testing. Technicians work primarily in hospitals or physicians’ offices, but may also work in diagnostic labs and similar facilities.

Some states, like California, require licensing and certification, while others do not, but either way, you require a high level of skill in interacting with patients. The average salary in 2012 was $35,000, working out at $12.50 an hour. The highest salaries are usually earned in laboratories, where they can rise to $75,000.

Physical therapist

A physical therapist is a highly-qualified health-care professional, who works closely with patients to improve their mobility and physical functioning. They work in a range of settings — not only hospitals, but clinics, schools, industrial settings, and fitness and sports facilities.

For a career in physical therapy, you require a graduate degree such as a DPT (Doctor of Physical Therapy). You then have to pass a state-administered national examination to receive your license. The median salary in 2013 was $86,030, ranging from $56,000 to $113,000.

Radiologist

Radiologists are very highly qualified medical doctors, specializing in using imaging technology to examine internal organs and tissues. They use not only x-rays, but ultrasound, CT and PET scans, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They also carry out surgical procedures using imaging guidelines.

Following medical school, a radiologist requires a 4-year radiology residency, and because the specialty requires top academic performance, an additional fellowship in a sub-specialism is also advisable. State licensure is also mandatory. Salaries are excellent, with the median salary in September 2014 reaching $329,323.

State tested nurse

State tested nurse aides (STNAs) are in great demand for work in hospitals, clinics, and care facilities. They work to improve the wellbeing of patients by helping with personal care, and monitoring their recovery progress. You can work as an STNA while training for more specialized jobs such as paramedics.

Most states offer a 108-hour STNA training program. This is available at community colleges and vocational schools, and you can take the state competency exam at the school. The average pay is $10.48 per hour.

Registered nurse

A registered nurse is the person with whom a hospital in-patient has the most contact. Registered nurses have the responsibility for monitoring a patient’s condition, carrying out prescribed medical procedures, and administering the correct medication. Many nurses specialize in a particular branch of medicine or advanced practice specialties such as nurse anesthetist or nurse practitioner.

For a career as a registered nurse, the industry standard qualification is the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree, plus the national licensing exam. The median salary in 2013 was $66,220, ranging from $45,630 to $96,320. The highest paid jobs are in California.

read more

Homepage

Careers in Healthcare

There has never been a better time to pursue a career in healthcare. Because of America’s aging population, the demand for healthcare professionals will only increase over the coming decade and beyond.

A career in healthcare can take many forms. Here are just a few of the possible career opportunities available. This is by no means a complete list:

  • Certified nurse assistant (or nurse’s aide)
  • Healthcare administrator
  • Home health aide
  • Licensed practical nurse
  • Medical assistant
  • Medical records and health information technicians
  • Patient care technician
  • Pharmacist
  • Phlebotomy technician
  • Physical therapist
  • Radiologist
  • State tested nurse’s aide
  • Registered nurse.

 

Certified nurse assistant

A certified nurse assistant or CNA (or in some states “State Tested Nurse Aide” or STNA), works alongside registered nurses to provide for patients’ basic health-care needs. These can include bathing, personal hygiene, feeding, and checking vital signs. CNAs usually work in hospitals, nursing homes, and elderly care homes.

The median salary is $24,420 though this is usually paid on an hourly basis averaging $10.78. For a career as a CNA, you need a high school diploma or GED, plus a 6-12 week certificate program. Demand for CNAs is high, so the job prospects are good.

Healthcare Administrator

Health care administrators work mainly in a hospital setting but may also work in such places as medical practices or home care agencies. They are responsible for managing and administering the facilities or departments, and ensuring compliance with government and state regulations.

Requirements include a 4-year bachelor’s degree plus, for higher-level positions, a graduate degree such as an MBA. The median salary in 2013 was $101,340. A health care administrator needs to be flexible, well-organized and a good communicator.

Home health aide

Home health aides work with the chronically sick, disabled or elderly. They most commonly work within a private home but may also work in an assisted living facility. Duties include helping with personal needs such as bathing and dressing, taking meals, light housework, and transporting to appointments.

There is no basic education or certification requirement, but those working in certified facilities are usually required to pass an exam after a 75-hour program. The median annual salary is $21,020, paid on an hourly basis of about $10.10.

Licensed practical nurse

Licensed practical nurses or LPNs work as members of a health-care team under the supervision of doctors and registered nurses. They perform a variety of duties, depending on requirements. Their work can include patient care, monitoring vital signs, and keeping charts up to date.

For a career as an LPN, you need to complete a 1-year certification program licensed in your state, and then pass your NCLEX-PN (National Council Licensure Examination — Practical Nurse) Exam. This enables you to apply for your license. The median salary is $41,540.

Medical Assistant

A medical assistant works alongside physicians to perform both clinical and administrative duties. Some are cross-trained to carry out both types of work while others specialize in one or the other.

Certification is not required but is preferred by most employers. Certifications include CMA (Certified Medical Assistant) or RMA (Registered Medical Assistant) and programs are available in most vocational schools and community colleges. The median annual wage was $29,370 in 2013.

Medical records and health information technicians

Medical records and health information technicians are responsible for arranging and organizing patients’ health information, and ensuring its accuracy. They also code and decode information for insurance purposes. They do not work directly with patients but work alongside registered nurses and other professionals, mainly in hospitals and doctors’ offices.

The median annual salary as of 2013 was $34,160. Certification, such as RHIT (Registered Health Information Technician) is not required but is usually preferred.

Patient care technician

A patient care technician, also known as a hospital assistant, works with health-care professionals to provide care for patients. This may include assistance with feeding, mobility requirements, and personal hygiene. It may also include taking and recording vital signs.

For a career as a patient care technician, you need a CNA (certified nursing assistant) certification, and to pass the NCPCT (National Certified Patient Care Technician) exam. You also need excellent interpersonal and communication skills. The median salary in 2013 was $24,890.

Pharmacist

Pharmacists are an integral part of the health-care team. They not only dispense medicine, but also check for interactions with other drugs, and instruct patients on the use of the drugs. Pharmacists usually run their own stores, but may also work in a hospital or other medical setting.

Pharmacy is an excellent career that requires a bachelor’s degree, followed by a 4-year PharmD (Doctor of Pharmacy) program, as a minimum. In order to practice, a state-specific license is also required. In 2013 the median salary was $119,280, ranging from $89,000 to $147,350.

Phlebotomy Technician

A phlebotomy technician specializes in drawing blood from the patient’s veins, treating the punctured area, and preparing the blood sample for testing. Technicians work primarily in hospitals or physicians’ offices, but may also work in diagnostic labs and similar facilities.

Some states, like California, require licensing and certification, while others do not, but either way, you require a high level of skill in interacting with patients. The average salary in 2012 was $35,000, working out at $12.50 an hour. The highest salaries are usually earned in laboratories, where they can rise to $75,000.

Physical therapist

A physical therapist is a highly-qualified health-care professional, who works closely with patients to improve their mobility and physical functioning. They work in a range of settings — not only hospitals, but clinics, schools, industrial settings, and fitness and sports facilities.

For a career in physical therapy, you require a graduate degree such as a DPT (Doctor of Physical Therapy). You then have to pass a state-administered national examination to receive your license. The median salary in 2013 was $86,030, ranging from $56,000 to $113,000.

Radiologist

Radiologists are very highly qualified medical doctors, specializing in using imaging technology to examine internal organs and tissues. They use not only x-rays, but ultrasound, CT and PET scans, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They also carry out surgical procedures using imaging guidelines.

Following medical school, a radiologist requires a 4-year radiology residency, and because the specialty requires top academic performance, an additional fellowship in a sub-specialism is also advisable. State licensure is also mandatory. Salaries are excellent, with the median salary in September 2014 reaching $329,323.

State tested nurse

State tested nurse aides (STNAs) are in great demand for work in hospitals, clinics, and care facilities. They work to improve the wellbeing of patients by helping with personal care, and monitoring their recovery progress. You can work as an STNA while training for more specialized jobs such as paramedics.

Most states offer a 108-hour STNA training program. This is available at community colleges and vocational schools, and you can take the state competency exam at the school. The average pay is $10.48 per hour.

Registered nurse

A registered nurse is the person with whom a hospital in-patient has the most contact. Registered nurses have the responsibility for monitoring a patient’s condition, carrying out prescribed medical procedures, and administering the correct medication. Many nurses specialize in a particular branch of medicine or advanced practice specialties such as nurse anesthetist or nurse practitioner.

For a career as a registered nurse, the industry standard qualification is the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree, plus the national licensing exam. The median salary in 2013 was $66,220, ranging from $45,630 to $96,320. The highest paid jobs are in California.

read more

Careers in Healthcare

There has never been a better time to pursue a career in healthcare. Because of America’s aging population, the demand for healthcare professionals will only increase over the coming decade and beyond.

A career in healthcare can take many forms. Here are just a few of the possible career opportunities available. This is by no means a complete list:

  • Certified nurse assistant (or nurse’s aide)
  • Healthcare administrator
  • Home health aide
  • Licensed practical nurse
  • Medical assistant
  • Medical records and health information technicians
  • Patient care technician
  • Pharmacist
  • Phlebotomy technician
  • Physical therapist
  • Radiologist
  • State tested nurse’s aide
  • Registered nurse.

 

Certified nurse assistant

A certified nurse assistant or CNA (or in some states “State Tested Nurse Aide” or STNA), works alongside registered nurses to provide for patients’ basic health-care needs. These can include bathing, personal hygiene, feeding, and checking vital signs. CNAs usually work in hospitals, nursing homes, and elderly care homes.

The median salary is $24,420 though this is usually paid on an hourly basis averaging $10.78. For a career as a CNA, you need a high school diploma or GED, plus a 6-12 week certificate program. Demand for CNAs is high, so the job prospects are good.

Healthcare Administrator

Health care administrators work mainly in a hospital setting but may also work in such places as medical practices or home care agencies. They are responsible for managing and administering the facilities or departments, and ensuring compliance with government and state regulations.

Requirements include a 4-year bachelor’s degree plus, for higher-level positions, a graduate degree such as an MBA. The median salary in 2013 was $101,340. A health care administrator needs to be flexible, well-organized and a good communicator.

Home health aide

Home health aides work with the chronically sick, disabled or elderly. They most commonly work within a private home but may also work in an assisted living facility. Duties include helping with personal needs such as bathing and dressing, taking meals, light housework, and transporting to appointments.

There is no basic education or certification requirement, but those working in certified facilities are usually required to pass an exam after a 75-hour program. The median annual salary is $21,020, paid on an hourly basis of about $10.10.

Licensed practical nurse

Licensed practical nurses or LPNs work as members of a health-care team under the supervision of doctors and registered nurses. They perform a variety of duties, depending on requirements. Their work can include patient care, monitoring vital signs, and keeping charts up to date.

For a career as an LPN, you need to complete a 1-year certification program licensed in your state, and then pass your NCLEX-PN (National Council Licensure Examination — Practical Nurse) Exam. This enables you to apply for your license. The median salary is $41,540.

Medical Assistant

A medical assistant works alongside physicians to perform both clinical and administrative duties. Some are cross-trained to carry out both types of work while others specialize in one or the other.

Certification is not required but is preferred by most employers. Certifications include CMA (Certified Medical Assistant) or RMA (Registered Medical Assistant) and programs are available in most vocational schools and community colleges. The median annual wage was $29,370 in 2013.

Medical records and health information technicians

Medical records and health information technicians are responsible for arranging and organizing patients’ health information, and ensuring its accuracy. They also code and decode information for insurance purposes. They do not work directly with patients but work alongside registered nurses and other professionals, mainly in hospitals and doctors’ offices.

The median annual salary as of 2013 was $34,160. Certification, such as RHIT (Registered Health Information Technician) is not required but is usually preferred.

Patient care technician

A patient care technician, also known as a hospital assistant, works with health-care professionals to provide care for patients. This may include assistance with feeding, mobility requirements, and personal hygiene. It may also include taking and recording vital signs.

For a career as a patient care technician, you need a CNA (certified nursing assistant) certification, and to pass the NCPCT (National Certified Patient Care Technician) exam. You also need excellent interpersonal and communication skills. The median salary in 2013 was $24,890.

Pharmacist

Pharmacists are an integral part of the health-care team. They not only dispense medicine, but also check for interactions with other drugs, and instruct patients on the use of the drugs. Pharmacists usually run their own stores, but may also work in a hospital or other medical setting.

Pharmacy is an excellent career that requires a bachelor’s degree, followed by a 4-year PharmD (Doctor of Pharmacy) program, as a minimum. In order to practice, a state-specific license is also required. In 2013 the median salary was $119,280, ranging from $89,000 to $147,350.

Phlebotomy Technician

A phlebotomy technician specializes in drawing blood from the patient’s veins, treating the punctured area, and preparing the blood sample for testing. Technicians work primarily in hospitals or physicians’ offices, but may also work in diagnostic labs and similar facilities.

Some states, like California, require licensing and certification, while others do not, but either way, you require a high level of skill in interacting with patients. The average salary in 2012 was $35,000, working out at $12.50 an hour. The highest salaries are usually earned in laboratories, where they can rise to $75,000.

Physical therapist

A physical therapist is a highly-qualified health-care professional, who works closely with patients to improve their mobility and physical functioning. They work in a range of settings — not only hospitals, but clinics, schools, industrial settings, and fitness and sports facilities.

For a career in physical therapy, you require a graduate degree such as a DPT (Doctor of Physical Therapy). You then have to pass a state-administered national examination to receive your license. The median salary in 2013 was $86,030, ranging from $56,000 to $113,000.

Radiologist

Radiologists are very highly qualified medical doctors, specializing in using imaging technology to examine internal organs and tissues. They use not only x-rays, but ultrasound, CT and PET scans, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They also carry out surgical procedures using imaging guidelines.

Following medical school, a radiologist requires a 4-year radiology residency, and because the specialty requires top academic performance, an additional fellowship in a sub-specialism is also advisable. State licensure is also mandatory. Salaries are excellent, with the median salary in September 2014 reaching $329,323.

State tested nurse

State tested nurse aides (STNAs) are in great demand for work in hospitals, clinics, and care facilities. They work to improve the wellbeing of patients by helping with personal care, and monitoring their recovery progress. You can work as an STNA while training for more specialized jobs such as paramedics.

Most states offer a 108-hour STNA training program. This is available at community colleges and vocational schools, and you can take the state competency exam at the school. The average pay is $10.48 per hour.

Registered nurse

A registered nurse is the person with whom a hospital in-patient has the most contact. Registered nurses have the responsibility for monitoring a patient’s condition, carrying out prescribed medical procedures, and administering the correct medication. Many nurses specialize in a particular branch of medicine or advanced practice specialties such as nurse anesthetist or nurse practitioner.

For a career as a registered nurse, the industry standard qualification is the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree, plus the national licensing exam. The median salary in 2013 was $66,220, ranging from $45,630 to $96,320. The highest paid jobs are in California.

Careers in Healthcare Image